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    Dating e internet mail messaging

    The information includes technical details, such as who created the message, the software used to compose it, and the email servers it passed through on its way to the recipient.

    You can use these details to identify problems with the email message or help discover the sources of unsolicited commercial email messages.

    Email operates across computer networks, which today is primarily the Internet.

    Some early email systems required the author and the recipient to both be online at the same time, in common with instant messaging.

    The history of modern Internet email services reaches back to the early ARPANET, with standards for encoding email messages published as early as 1973 (RFC 561).Header fields are well defined lines beginning with a field name, followed by a colon (":"), followed by a field body, and terminated by CRLF.Header field bodies may have a structured or unstructured syntax.The header section is a sequence of lines of characters with special syntax as defined in this specification.The body is simply a sequence of characters that follows the header section and is separated from the header section by an empty line (i.e., a line with nothing preceding the CRLF).Neither the users nor their computers are required to be online simultaneously; they need to connect only briefly, typically to a mail server or a webmail interface, for as long as it takes to send or receive messages.Originally an ASCII text-only communications medium, Internet email was extended by Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) to carry text in other character sets and multimedia content attachments.In several cases, the description is just an educated (? The use of the word nonstandard here typically means just lack of more specific information; it does In RFC 822 clause 4.7.4 says: "A limited number of common fields have been defined in this document.As network mail requirements dictate, additional fields may be standardized.The document compiles information from other RFCs such as RFC 822, RFC 1036, RFC 1123, RFC 1327, RFC 1496, RFC 1521, RFC 1766, RFC 1806, RFC 1864 and RFC 1911. Table of headers.......................................... 3 3.1 Phrases used in the tables.......................... Author's Address.......................................... 20 Appendix A: Headers sorted by Internet RFC document in which they appear.A few commonly occurring headers which are not defined in RFCs are also included. Use of gatewaying headers................................. 3 3.2 Trace information................................... 5 3.3 Format and control information...................... 5 3.4 Sender and recipient indication..................... 6 3.5 Response control.................................... 9 3.6 Message identification and referral headers......... References................................................ 21 Appendix B: Alphabetical index........................................... 25 Many different Internet standards and RFCs define headers which may occur on Internet Mail Messages and Usenet News Articles.If the message is for someone who does not have a mailbox on your email server, the server forwards the message to another email server. It may go through several email servers until it reaches the email server on which the recipient of the message has a mailbox.From the time when the message is first created, information about it is added to a hidden section of the message known as the Internet header.Status of this Memo This memo provides information for the Internet community.

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